Current portal location

Website content

Document search by section

Sustainability Impact Assessment (SIA)

281 document(s) found, displaying 20 per page. Try a different query?

  1. Sustainability Impact Assessment (SIA): Final inception report of the sustainability impact assessment in support of negotiations with partner countries in Eastern and Southern Africa in view of deepening the existing interim economic partnership agreement
    • Abstract: The inception phase develops a factual introduction to the study, presents an analysis of existing studies and reports, carries out a preliminary screening of economic, social, human rights, environmental and development cooperation impacts, finalises the methodology in agreement with the Commission and presents the stakeholder consultation strategy.
    • 15 October 2020
    • Type: Issues and policies
    • Source: Other source
    • Format: PDF
  2. Sustainability Impact Assessment (SIA): Draft Inception Report for Sustainability Impact Assessment in Support of Negotiations with Partner Countries in Eastern and Southern Africa in view of Deepening the Existing Interim Economic Partnership Agreement
    • Abstract: The Inception Report concludes the first part of the project “Sustainability Impact Assessment (SIA) in support of negotiations with partner countries in Eastern and Southern Africa (ESA) in view of deepening the existing interim Economic Partnership Agreement (EPA)”.
    • 23 July 2020
    • Type: Official document
    • Source: Other source
    • Format: PDF
  3. Sustainability Impact Assessment (SIA): Sustainability Impact Assessment in Support of the Association Agreement Negotiations between the European Union and Mercosur - Draft Final Report
    • Abstract: The trade relations between the EU and Mercosur are essential for both blocs, given that the EU is the second trading partner for Mercosur and Mercosur the eleventh trading partner for the EU. An inter-regional Framework Cooperation Agreement from 1999 currently forms the basis for EU-Mercosur trade relations. Following negotiations since 2000, in June 2019 the EU and Mercosur reached a political agreement for an Association Agreement including a trade component. This Sustainability Impact Assessment (SIA) provides an examination of the potential economic, social, human rights and environmental impact of the trade component of an Association Agreement between the EU and Mercosur, specifically Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay and Uruguay. This analysis lays the basis for designing flanking and mitigating measures a number of which are proposed throughout the study. The report employs the dynamic version of the GTAP Model known as GDyn to study the impacts of two scenarios, one conservative and one more ambitious, with respect to the outcome of the negotiations in terms of tariff and non-tariff measures reductions by both parties. For Mercosur the conservative scenario assumes elimination of tariffs in 90% of the industrial products and 80% in agricultural products. In the ambitious scenario, Mercosur eliminates tariffs in 100% of products. The EU eliminates tariffs in all industrial products in both scenarios, applies partial tariff cuts of 15% in the conservative scenario and 30% in the ambitious scenario in rice, sugar, ruminant meat and other meat sectors. For the cereals and the dairy sector, cuts of 15% are applied in the conservative scenario and cuts of 100% in the ambitious scenario. Quantitative methods are then combined with qualitative approaches to address social, environmental and human rights impacts of the free trade agreement as well as the specific economic impacts on ten important sectors1. This qualitative analysis draws on extensive consultation with stakeholders in both regions through workshops, civil society dialogues, questionnaires and interviews. In the conservative scenario, GDP in the EU expands by 10.9 billion Euros (0.1%) and in Mercosur by 7.4 billion Euros (0.3%) by 2032, in comparison to the modelling baseline without the FTA. In the ambitious scenario, GDP in the EU expands by 15 billion Euros (0.1%) and in Mercosur by 11.4 billion Euros.
    • 2 July 2020
    • Type: Official document
    • Source: Commission
    • Format: PDF
  4. Sustainability Impact Assessment (SIA): European Commission services' position paper on the SIA in support of negotiations for the modernisation of the trade part of the EU-Chile Association Agreement
    • Abstract: This paper sets out the European Commission services' position on the Sustainability Impact Assessment (SIA) on the modernisation of the Trade Part of the EU – Chile Association Agreement (the Agreement). The SIA was commissioned by the European Commission's Directorate-General for Trade and was carried out by the independent consultancy company BKP Research and Consulting, together with the Catholic University of Valparaiso (Centro Vincular). The study was completed in May 2019 and has fed and continues to feed directly into the negotiations. The Agreement entered into force in its trade part in February 2003. Considerable trade and investment policy developments have taken place since then. The Agreement has led to a significant increase in bilateral trade in goods from €7.7 billion in 2003 to an all-time high of €18.9 billion in 2011, and a marginal decline since then to €18.3 billion in 2018. Over time, the EU’s relative weight as a trading partner has declined as the EU went from being Chile’s first trading partner in 2007 to third in 2018. The EU, however, remains Chile’s largest source of FDI. Moreover, both the EU and Chile have meanwhile concluded or are negotiating ambitious and comprehensive preferential trade agreements with other trading partners that go far beyond the provisions of the Agreement. In 2013, the EU and Chile agreed to explore to comprehensively modernise the Agreement and negotiations for an ambitious, comprehensive and progressive modernised Agreement were launched on 16 November 2017.
    • 1 June 2020
    • Type: Official document
    • Source: Commission
    • Format: PDF
  5. Sustainability Impact Assessment (SIA): Executive summary in EN - May 2019
    • Abstract: When it entered into force in 2003, the original EU-Chile Association Agreement was a path-breaking agreement, providing for deep liberalisation of goods trade, WTO-plus rules in areas such as sanitary and phytosanitary standards, broad liberalisation commitments on trade in services and foreign direct investment, commitments on government procurement and intellectual property, including mutual protection of geographical indications, trade facilitation, and innovative institutional provisions. Evaluations of the impact of the original Agreement suggest that it worked powerfully to support bilateral trade at a time when Chile was highly active in entering into FTAs with other parties, and thus avoided putting EU suppliers at a competitive disadvantage in the Chilean market; EU services exporters benefited in particular. However, with the passage of time and the evolution of the EU’s FTA approach, the original Agreement now lags in important areas and still leaves some room for liberalisation in traditional areas. Therefore, Chile and the EU agreed to enter into negotiations for a modernisation of the Agreement. These negotiations started in November 2017 and are currently ongoing. 2. This is the final report for the Trade Sustainability Impact Assessment (SIA) in support of the negotiations to modernise the trade pillar of the existing EU-Chile Association Agreement. The report presents findings of the potential economic, social, human rights and environmental impacts (the four “sustainability pillars”) stemming from provisions in the modernised Agreement or being a consequence of removing or reducing remaining barriers to bilateral trade and investment between the EU and Chile. The report also provides a number of recommendations, derived from the analysis, on issues to be incorporated into the modernised Agreement and mitigating measures. Furthermore, it describes the methodology used and, in a separate appendix, a summary of the consultation activities and contributions received from stakeholders in Chile and the EU. The research for the report was undertaken by a team of researchers from BKP Development Research & Consulting and the Catholic University of Valparaiso’s Centro Vincular under a contract with the European Commission’s DG Trade.
    • Languages:
    • 7 May 2020
    • Type: Official document
    • Source: Commission
    • Format: PDF
  6. Sustainability Impact Assessment (SIA): Interim Report - Mercosur SIA
    • Abstract: The Interim Report for the EU-Mercosur Association Agreement (AA) Sustainability Impact Assessment (SIA) builds on the Inception Report of the study and provides the corefindings of the study. The report presents the quantitative and qualitative results of the economic analysis, environmental, social, and human rights (HR) analyses. For each component of analysis, the interim report links the initial qualitative analysis undertaken at the inception phase with the results of the CGE modelling. The Interim Report also outlines the key findings for the selected sectors, where for each sectoral chapter we report on the economic baseline and economic impact of an agreement, the social, environmental and human rights impacts, as well as the impact on consumers, small and medium enterprises (SMEs), least developed countries (LDCs) and EU’s outermost regions (OMRs).The Interim Report will be followed by a Final Report, which will include recommendations to maximise the benefits of the agreement while preventing or minimising potential negative impacts, summary and analysis of the stakeholder consultation, as well as feedback from stakeholders at the latest round of the Civil Society Dialogue (CSD).
    • 1 February 2020
    • Type: Other
    • Source: Commission
    • Format: PDF
  7. Sustainability Impact Assessment (SIA): Draft Final Report NZ - ANNEXES
    • Abstract: Detailing the economic approach The starting point for the economic analysis in this report is the economic modelling undertaken by the Commission (European Commission, 2017), as updated in March 2019, which is an appropriate and accepted approach for analysis of trade agreements dealing with traditional issues of cross-border trade in goods and services. The economic variables for focus include trade flows (bilateral exports and imports; exports and imports to the rest of the world; investment; output; prices; welfare and GDP; and fiscal revenues. Further analysis, in subsequent reporting, is based on the revised CGE simulation results from DG Trade. The analysis includes both scenarios (modest and ambitious) and also include a discussion on the limitations of the modelling (e.g. pertaining to preference utilisation and not including innovation/dynamic FDI effects). A stronger focus is placed on New Zealand because the anticipated effects of the FTA are much larger there than in the EU in relative terms, due to the different sizes of the two economies. We build on this analysis by providing a qualitative and, to the extent possible, quantitative, assessment of the main non-tariff measures (NTMs), investment and other behind-theborder issues of particular relevance to the EU-NZ FTA. An example is New Zealand’s Electrical Equipment Safety System (EESS) that applies to the import of all electrical equipment and requires various testing, documentation and certification procedures, imposing direct and indirect costs on EU SMEs.
    • 13 December 2019
    • Type: Issues and policies
    • Source: Commission
    • Format: PDF
  8. Sustainability Impact Assessment (SIA): Draft Final Report AUS - ANNEXES
    • Abstract: Detailing the economic approach: The starting point for the economic analysis in this report is the modelling (a Computable General Equilibrium (CGE) model) undertaken by the Commission (in the study supporting the impact assessment carried out by LSE Enterprise, 2017), which is an appropriate and accepted approach for analysis of trade agreements dealing with traditional issues of crossborder trade in goods and services. The economic variables for focus include trade flows (bilateral exports and imports; exports and imports to the rest of the world); investment; output; prices; welfare and GDP; and fiscal revenues. Further analysis, in subsequent reporting, will be based on the revised CGE simulation results from DG Trade. The analysis will also include a discussion on the limitations of the CGE results (e.g. pertaining to preference utilisation and not including innovation/dynamic FDI effects). We will build on this analysis by providing a qualitative and, to the extent possible, quantitative, assessment of the main non-tariff measures (NTMs), investment and other behind-the-border issues of relevance to the EU-AUS FTA. These include: • Strict phytosanitary import regulations in Australia for fresh fruits and vegetables; • Australia’s Electrical Equipment Safety System (EESS) that applies to the import of all electrical equipment and requires various testing, documentation and certification procedures, imposing direct and indirect costs on EU SMEs; and • Foreign investment above certain defined thresholds is subject to screening in Australia, which has become more complex over time, with additional screening mandated for sensitive sectors such as media, real estate, defence, telecommunications, air transport and airports, encryption and security.
    • 13 December 2019
    • Type: Issues and policies
    • Source: Commission
    • Format: PDF
  9. Sustainability Impact Assessment (SIA): Draft Final Report EXECUTIVE SUMMARY (Australia)
    • Abstract: This draft final report for the Trade Sustainability Impact Assessment (SIA) in support of the free trade agreement (FTA) negotiations between the European Union (EU) and Australia presents findings of the potential economic, social, human rights and environmental impacts stemming from provisions in the FTA or being a consequence of removing or reducing barriers to bilateral trade and investment between the EU and Australia. The report also provides a number of recommendations, derived from the analysis, on issues to be incorporated into the FTA and mitigating measures. 2. The starting point for the SIA analysis was the simulation of the FTA’s economic effects undertaken by the European Commission DG Trade in early 2019 using a Computable General Equilibrium (CGE) model, which simulates the effects of two alternative negotiation outcomes with different degrees of liberalisation: 1) a conservative scenario, which comprises elimination of tariffs on non-agricultural products (but not agricultural products), and some services trade liberalisation; and 2) an ambitious scenario, which comprises a full elimination of tariffs and quotas also on agricultural trade as well as a reduction of some non-tariff barriers on non-agricultural goods. It should be highlighted that this ambitious scenario is based on a theoretical assumption of a full elimination of tariffs and quotas in the agricultural sector. Such scenario has not been followed by the Commission in any trade negotiation.
    • 13 December 2019
    • Type: Issues and policies
    • Source: Commission
    • Format: PDF
  10. Sustainability Impact Assessment (SIA): Draft Final Report EXECUTIVE SUMMARY (New Zealand)
    • Abstract: This draft final report for the Trade Sustainability Impact Assessment (SIA) in support of the free trade agreement (FTA) negotiations between the European Union (EU) and New Zealand presents findings of the potential economic, social, human rights and environmental impacts stemming from provisions in the FTA or being a consequence of removing or reducing barriers to bilateral trade and investment between the EU and New Zealand. The report also provides a number of recommendations, derived from the analysis, on issues to be incorporated into the FTA and mitigating measures. 2. The starting point for the SIA analysis was the simulation of the FTA’s economic effects undertaken by the European Commission DG Trade in early 2019 using a Computable General Equilibrium (CGE) model, which simulates the effects of two alternative negotiation outcomes with different degrees of liberalisation: 1) a conservative scenario, which comprises elimination of tariffs on non-agricultural products (but not agricultural products), and some services trade liberalisation; and 2) an ambitious scenario, which comprises a full elimination of tariffs and quotas also on agricultural trade as well as a reduction of some non-tariff barriers on non-agricultural goods. It should be highlighted that this ambitious scenario is based on a theoretical assumption of a full elimination of tariffs and quotas in the agricultural sector. Such scenario has not been followed by the Commission in any trade negotiation.
    • 13 December 2019
    • Type: Issues and policies
    • Source: Commission
    • Format: PDF
  11. Sustainability Impact Assessment (SIA): Draft Final Report (New Zealand)
    • Abstract: This report examines the potential economic, social, human rights and environmental impact of the EU-New Zealand FTA. We employ a multi-pronged methodological approach, combining the economic modelling results provided by DG Trade with qualitative analysis based on literature review, discussions with experts and extensive consultations with key stakeholders. The EU-New Zealand trade and investment relationship is characterised by relatively low tariff and non-tariff barriers on average, but with peaks for certain products and regulations. The analysis of the potential economic impacts shows overall positive macro-economic effects for the EU and New Zealand, based on an analysis also incorporating an FTA between the EU and Australia. In the EU, bilateral exports in 2030 are expected to be 31.7 percent higher compared to a situation without the FTA, and real GDP to increase marginally (all in the ambitious scenario). For New Zealand, bilateral exports are expected to expand by 23.4 percent, welfare by €567 million, and real GDP by 0.5 percent. There is, however, sectoral variation with beverages and tobacco, vegetables & fruits and dairy gaining most in New Zealand and motor vehicles and machinery in the EU. SMEs in the EU and New Zealand as well as consumers in both countries are also expected to benefit. The trade diversion effect for third countries will be very limited, while value chain analysis shows that connected third country economies could benefit. Wages are expected to remain equal (for the EU) or increase (for New Zealand) for both unskilled and skilled workers. The human rights effects are expected to be marginal, except for some potential effects in sectors that are negatively impacted. Environmental effects are expected to be marginally negative.
    • 13 December 2019
    • Type: Issues and policies
    • Source: Commission
    • Format: PDF
  12. Sustainability Impact Assessment (SIA): Draft Final Report (Australia)
    • Abstract: This report examines the potential economic, social, human rights and environmental impact of the EU-Australia FTA. We employ a multi-pronged methodological approach, combining the economic modelling results provided by DG Trade with qualitative analysis based on literature review, discussions with experts and extensive consultations with key stakeholders. The EU-Australia trade and investment relationship is characterised by relatively low tariff and non-tariff barriers on average, but with peaks for certain products and regulations. The analysis of the potential economic impacts shows overall positive macro-economic effects for both the EU and Australia, based on an analysis also incorporating an FTA between the EU and New Zealand. In the EU, welfare in 2030 is expected to increase by €4.1 billion and real GDP by €3.9 billion, compared to a situation without the FTA, and Australian welfare and real GDP are expected to increase by €1.4 billion and 4.7 billion, respectively (in the ambitious scenario). Bilateral exports are expected to increase by 32.5 percent and 10.4 percent respectively for the EU and Australia in the ambitious scenario. There is, however, sectoral variation with ruminant meats benefiting most in Australia and motor vehicles and machinery in the EU. SMEs in the EU and Australia as well as consumers in both countries are also expected to benefit. The trade diversion effect for third countries will be very limited, while value chain analysis shows that connected third country economies could benefit. Wages are expected to remain equal (for the EU) or increase marginally (for Australia) for both unskilled and skilled workers. The human rights effects are expected to be marginal, except for some potential effects in sectors that are negatively impacted. Environmental effects are expected to be marginally negative.
    • 13 December 2019
    • Type: Issues and policies
    • Source: Commission
    • Format: PDF
  13. Sustainability Impact Assessment (SIA): Commission Position Paper on EU-Mexico SIA
    • Abstract: European Commission services' Position Paper on the Sustainability Impact Assessment in support of negotiations for the modernisation.
    • 12 December 2019
    • Type: Official document
    • Source: Commission
    • Format: PDF
  14. Sustainability Impact Assessment (SIA): ESA Terms of Reference
    • Abstract: Economic Partnership Agreements (EPAs) are development-oriented agreements that have been negotiated with regions and countries of the ACP group of states. The EU currently implements 7 EPAs: with the Caribbean (14 out of 15 CARIFORUM states), the Pacific (Fiji, Papua New Guinea and Samoa), six countries of the Southern African Development Community (SADC), Cameroon, Ghana and Cote d’Ivoire, as well as an interim EPA with five countries in the Eastern and Southern African Region (ESA)1. In 2007, six countries of the ESA region (Comoros, Madagascar, Mauritius, the Seychelles, Zambia and Zimbabwe) concluded an interim Economic Partnership Agreement (iEPA) with the EU. In 2009, four countries (Madagascar, Mauritius, Seychelles and Zimbabwe) signed the agreement, which has been provisionally applied for these countries since 14 May 2012. 2 Mauritius and Seychelles started liberalising tariffs on EU imports in 2013 and Madagascar and Zimbabwe started liberalising in 2016 and 2017 respectively. The EPA foresees consecutive rounds of liberalisation over 10 years and the tariff liberalisation process should conclude in 2022.
    • 5 December 2019
    • Type: Official document
    • Source: Commission
    • Format: PDF
  15. Sustainability Impact Assessment (SIA): Sustainability Impact Assessment (SIA): EU-Mexico
    • Abstract: Sustainability Impact Assessment (SIA) in support of the negotiations for the modernisation of the trade part of the Global Agreement with Mexico.
    • 17 September 2019
    • Type: Official document
    • Source: Commission
    • Format: PDF
  16. Sustainability Impact Assessment (SIA): Inception Report (New Zealand) - May 2019
    • Abstract: The European Commission has commissioned a Sustainability Impact Assessment (SIA) in support of the free trade agreement (FTA) negotiations between the European Union and New Zealand. The SIA is aimed at providing a robust analysis of the potential economic, social, human rights and environmental impacts that the trade agreement under negotiation could have, in the EU and New Zealand and in other relevant regions and countries. It also encompasses a continuous and wide-ranging consultation process which to ensure transparency and the engagement of all relevant stakeholders in the conduct of the SIA inside and outside the EU. The goal of the SIA is to provide an integrated, independent, evidence-based, transparent, participatory, and proportionate study on the potential effects of the EU-New Zealand FTA
    • 10 May 2019
    • Type: Official document
    • Source: Commission
    • Format: PDF
  17. Sustainability Impact Assessment (SIA): Sustainability Impact Assessment in Support of the Negotiations for the Modernisation of the Trade Part of the Association Agreement with Chile - Final Report, 07 May 2019
    • Abstract: This is the final report for the Trade Sustainability Impact Assessment (SIA) in support of the negotiations to modernise the trade pillar of the existing EU-Chile Association Agreement. The report presents findings of the analysis regarding the potential economic, social, human rights and environmental impacts (the four “sustainability pillars”) stemming from provisions in the modernised Agreement or being a consequence of removing or reducing remaining barriers to bilateral trade and investment between the EU and Chile. The report also presents recommendations for issues to be addressed in the modernised Agreement and mitigating measures. It furthermore describes the methodology used and, in a separate appendix, a summary of the consultation activities and contributions received from stakeholders in Chile and the EU. Summarising the main findings, the modernised Agreement is unlikely to raise sustainability concerns across the four sustainability pillars at the economy-wide level for either Chile or the EU. The modernised Agreement builds on the already substantial existing liberalisation in the current EU-Chile Agreement and thus the expected economic effects are relatively small. Nevertheless, some effects – both positive and negative – in particular for specific sectors, areas, or for groups of people (which are analysed in a series of sector and case studies) cannot be excluded. Potential negative effects can be mitigated, and positive effects enhanced by incorporating appropriate provisions into the text of the modernised Agreement, notably in relation to trade and sustainable development, and trade and gender. In addition, domestic measures by Chile and the European Union can also help mitigate or enhance potential impacts.
    • 7 May 2019
    • Type: Issues and policies
    • Source: Commission
    • Format: PDF
  18. Sustainability Impact Assessment (SIA): Inception Report (Australia)
    • Abstract: The European Commission has commissioned a Sustainability Impact Assessment (SIA) in support of the free trade agreement (FTA) negotiations between the European Union and Australia. The SIA is aims at providing a robust analysis of the potential economic, social, human rights and environmental impacts that the trade agreement under negotiation could have, in the EU and Australia and in other relevant regions and countries. It also encompasses a continuous and wide-ranging consultation process which to ensure transparency and the engagement of all relevant stakeholders in the conduct of the SIA inside and outside the EU. The goal of the SIA is to provide an integrated, independent, evidence-based, transparent, participatory, and proportionate study on the potential effects of the EU-Australia FTA.
    • 1 May 2019
    • Type: Official document
    • Source: Commission
    • Format: PDF
  19. Sustainability Impact Assessment (SIA): Final interim report Indonesia
    • Abstract: In 2007, Free Trade Agreement (FTA) negotiations were launched between the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), which includes Indonesia, and the European Union. However, by 2009, negotiations with ASEAN were paused and gave way to bilateral negotiations. Negotiations for an EU-Indonesia FTA were launched on 18 July 2016 and seek to enhance trade and investment relations. The Comprehensive Partnership and Cooperation Agreement which entered into force in 2014 governs the overall relations between the EU and Indonesia. The aim of these FTA negotiations is to eliminate or reduce tariff and non-tariff barriers to trade in agricultural products, manufactured goods and services and thereby facilitate trade flows, realize the untapped potential of and expand FDI, level the playing field between private businesses and state-owned enterprises, and contributing to sustainable development objectives. It is in this vein that DG Trade has commissioned the preparation of a Trade Sustainability Impact Assessment (SIA) for FTA negotiations between the EU and Indonesia.
    • 19 April 2019
    • Type: Official document
    • Source: Commission
    • Format: PDF
  20. Sustainability Impact Assessment (SIA): Final interim report Indonesia
    • Abstract: In 2007, Free Trade Agreement (FTA) negotiations were launched between the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), which includes Indonesia, and the European Union. However, by 2009, negotiations with ASEAN were paused and gave way to bilateral negotiations. Negotiations for an EU-Indonesia FTA were launched on 18 July 2016 and seek to enhance trade and investment relations. The Comprehensive Partnership and Cooperation Agreement which entered into force in 2014 governs the overall relations between the EU and Indonesia. The aim of these FTA negotiations is to eliminate or reduce tariff and non-tariff barriers to trade in agricultural products, manufactured goods and services and thereby facilitate trade flows, realize the untapped potential of and expand FDI, level the playing field between private businesses and state-owned enterprises, and contributing to sustainable development objectives. It is in this vein that DG Trade has commissioned the preparation of a Trade Sustainability Impact Assessment (SIA) for FTA negotiations between the EU and Indonesia.
    • 19 April 2019
    • Type: Official document
    • Source: Commission
    • Format: PDF

Commissioner website

EU Trade Commissioner